Decline of the North American avifauna

@article{Rosenberg2019DeclineOT,
  title={Decline of the North American avifauna},
  author={K. Rosenberg and A. Dokter and P. Blancher and J. Sauer and Adam C. Smith and P. Smith and Jessica C. Stanton and Arvind O. Panjabi and Laura Helft and M. Parr and P. Marra},
  journal={Science},
  year={2019},
  volume={366},
  pages={120 - 124}
}
Staggering decline of bird populations Because birds are conspicuous and easy to identify and count, reliable records of their occurrence have been gathered over many decades in many parts of the world. Drawing on such data for North America, Rosenberg et al. report wide-spread population declines of birds over the past half-century, resulting in the cumulative loss of billions of breeding individuals across a wide range of species and habitats. They show that declines are not restricted to… Expand
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