Decline of breast-feeding among New York urban poor linked to sources of information on infant feeding practices: a lesson for African countries.

Abstract

Using a structured interview schedule, the relationship between infant feeding practices and sources of information on infant feeding was evaluated. Subjects of the study were 2 matched groups of breast feeding and non-breast feeding mothers of low socioeconomic status in New York City. It was found that non-breast feeding mothers received significantly more information (p 0.01) from the baby food industry, physicians, and nurses than breast feeding mothers. By contrast, breast feeders received significantly more information (p 0.03) from relatives, friends, and organizations that promote breast feeding than did the non-breast feeders. Over 80% of educational materials on infant feeding, supplied freely to mothers attending ante- and postnatal clinics, were produced by different infant food industries compared with only 17% of such materials produced by the professionals; the materials produced by infant food industries were essentially promotional of the respective company's products with a high potential for discouraging breast feeding. It is suggested that health workers in developing countries should produce and utilize educational materials on infant feeding practices relevant to their respective communities instead of relying on the supply of these materials by baby food manufactures.author's modified

Cite this paper

@article{Isenalumhe1984DeclineOB, title={Decline of breast-feeding among New York urban poor linked to sources of information on infant feeding practices: a lesson for African countries.}, author={T E Isenalumhe}, journal={Nigerian journal of paediatrics}, year={1984}, volume={11 2}, pages={41-5} }