Decline and Extermination of an Arctic Wolf Population in East Greenland, 1899–1939

@article{MarquardPetersen2012DeclineAE,
  title={Decline and Extermination of an Arctic Wolf Population in East Greenland, 1899–1939},
  author={Ulf Marquard-Petersen},
  journal={Arctic},
  year={2012},
  volume={65},
  pages={155-166}
}
The decline and extermination of an arctic wolf population in East Greenland between 1899 and 1939 were investigated through analysis of 40 years of archival data, which contained records of 252 sightings of wolves or their tracks. Prior to the start of exploitation by Europeans, this small, isolated wolf population probably consisted of about 38 wolves during an average year. Of 112 wolves sighted in early winter, 31.3% were lone wolves, 23.2% were in pairs, and the rest were in larger groups… Expand

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