Deciphering the Origin of Dogs: From Fossils to Genomes.

@article{Freedman2017DecipheringTO,
  title={Deciphering the Origin of Dogs: From Fossils to Genomes.},
  author={Adam H. Freedman and Robert K. Wayne},
  journal={Annual review of animal biosciences},
  year={2017},
  volume={5},
  pages={
          281-307
        }
}
Understanding the timing and geographic context of dog origins is a crucial component for understanding human history, as well as the evolutionary context in which the morphological and behavioral divergence of dogs from wolves occurred. A substantial challenge to understanding domestication is that dogs have experienced a complicated demographic history. An initial severe bottleneck was associated with domestication followed by postdivergence gene flow between dogs and wolves, as well as… 
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