Deciphering ocean carbon in a changing world

@article{Moran2016DecipheringOC,
  title={Deciphering ocean carbon in a changing world},
  author={Mary Ann Moran and Elizabeth B. Kujawinski and Aron Stubbins and Rob Fatland and Lihini I. Aluwihare and Alison Buchan and Byron C. Crump and Pieter C. Dorrestein and Sonya T. Dyhrman and Nancy J. Hess and Bill Howe and Krista Longnecker and Patricia M. Medeiros and Jutta Niggemann and Ingrid Obernosterer and Daniel J. Repeta and Jacob R. Waldbauer},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences},
  year={2016},
  volume={113},
  pages={3143 - 3151}
}
Dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the oceans is one of the largest pools of reduced carbon on Earth, comparable in size to the atmospheric CO2 reservoir. A vast number of compounds are present in DOM, and they play important roles in all major element cycles, contribute to the storage of atmospheric CO2 in the ocean, support marine ecosystems, and facilitate interactions between organisms. At the heart of the DOM cycle lie molecular-level relationships between the individual compounds in DOM… 

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