Decerebrate mammalian preparations: unalleviated or fully alleviated pain? A review and opinion.

Abstract

In experimental decerebration of mammals, the cerebral cortex and thalamus are surgically or otherwise inactivated under traditional (pharmacologic) general anesthesia. Once the effects of the pharmacologic anesthesia have dissipated, the animal remains alive, but there is neither pain sensation nor consciousness. Because the Animal Welfare Act and its regulations recognize drugs as the only means to alleviate pain, it is unclear whether a decerebrate animal should be placed in U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) pain and distress category D (pain or distress alleviated by drugs) or E (unalleviated pain or distress). We present a rationale for including decerebrate animals in USDA category D. We also provide a general review of decerebration and suggestions for institutional animal care and use committees having to evaluate decerebration protocols.

Cite this paper

@article{Silverman2005DecerebrateMP, title={Decerebrate mammalian preparations: unalleviated or fully alleviated pain? A review and opinion.}, author={Jerald Silverman and Nelson L. Garnett and Simon F. Giszter and Charles J . Heckman and Jodie A Kulpa-Eddy and Michel Lemay and Constance K Perry and Martin J. Pinter}, journal={Contemporary topics in laboratory animal science}, year={2005}, volume={44 4}, pages={34-6} }