Deception in Psychological Research

@article{Christensen1988DeceptionIP,
  title={Deception in Psychological Research},
  author={Larry B. Christensen},
  journal={Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin},
  year={1988},
  volume={14},
  pages={664 - 675}
}
  • L. Christensen
  • Published 1988
  • Psychology
  • Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Deception has been attacked repeatedly as ethically unacceptable and morally reprehensible. However, research has revealed that subjects who have participated in deception experiments versus nondeception experiments enjoyed the experience more, received more educational benefit from it, and did not mind being deceived or having their privacy invaded. Such evidence suggests that deception, although unethical from a moral point of view, is not considered to be aversive, undesirable, or an… Expand
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Critics of deception in research allege harm to society, the discipline of psychology, the researchers and participants. However, neither empirical findings nor a ‘reasonable-person’ test seem toExpand
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Recently, it has been argued that the evidence in social science research suggests that deceiving subjects in an experiment does not lead to a significant loss of experimental control. Based on thisExpand
The Costs of Deception: Evidence from Psychology
Recently, it has been argued that the evidence in social science research suggests that deceiving subjects in an experiment does not lead to a significant loss of experimental control. Based on thisExpand
The Costs of Deception: Evidence from Psychology
Recently, it has been argued that the evidence in social science research suggests that deceiving subjects in an experiment does not lead to a significant loss of experimental control. Based on thisExpand
Suspicion, Affective Response, and Educational Benefit as a Result of Deception in Psychology Research
This research evaluated participants' reactions to deception in experiments by having them participate in a replication of a deception experiment. Half of the participants were made aware of thisExpand
Twenty Years of Deception Research: A Decline in Subjects' Trust?
Early critical reaction to the practice of deceiving research subjects suggested that its continued use would lead to a negative view of the discipline and distrust by future subjects. In spite ofExpand
Deception in Research: Distinctions and Solutions From the Perspective of Utilitarianism
The use of deception in psychological research continues to be a controversial topic. Using Rawls's explication of utilitarianism, I attempt to demonstrate how professional organizations, such as theExpand
Experimental economics and deception
Abstract Several leading experimental economists have independently proposed that deception should be proscribed on methodological grounds as an experimental technique. The basis for thisExpand
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References

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TLDR
A study of participants' reactions to deception is reported and the implications of the results for the deliberations of IRBs are discussed. Expand
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Factors affecting judgments of the ethical acceptability of research practices are investigated. The major focus is on two variables affecting information processing-labeling and salience. InExpand
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“The S has the right to expect that the psychologist with whom he is interacting has some concern for his welfare, and the personal attributes and professional skill to express his good willExpand
Alternatives to Deception: Why, What, and How?
The purpose of this chapter is to explore methods in social science research that do not rely on deception. Implicit in this inquiry into scientifically valid methods that minimize the risk of harmExpand
The Effects of Deception and Level of Obedience on Subjects' Ratings of the Milgram Study
Subjects read one of four versions of the Milgram (1964) obedience experiment. Both the degree of obedience and the amount of deception depicted in the descriptions were varied in a 2 X 2 design.Expand
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TLDR
A woman is asked to remove her clothing one article at a time until she is completely nude in a room full of strangers, and is interested in studying her reactions to this situation. Expand
Follow-up Analysis of the Use of Deception and Aversive Contingencies in Psychological Experiments
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TLDR
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TLDR
This article describes a procedure for the study of destructive obedience in the laboratory, ordering a naive S to administer increasingly more severe punishment to a victim in the context of a learning experiment, which created extreme levels of nervous tension in some Ss. Expand
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