Decay rates of attractive and repellent pheromones in an ant foraging trail network

@article{Robinson2008DecayRO,
  title={Decay rates of attractive and repellent pheromones in an ant foraging trail network},
  author={Elva J. H. Robinson and Kaitlin Elinor Green and E. A. Jenner and Mike Holcombe and Francis L. W. Ratnieks},
  journal={Insectes Sociaux},
  year={2008},
  volume={55},
  pages={246-251}
}
Abstract.Pharaoh’s ants (Monomorium pharaonis) use at least three types of foraging trail pheromone: a long-lasting attractive pheromone and two short-lived pheromones, one attractive and one repellent. We measured the decay rates of the behavioural response of ant workers at a trail bifurcation to trail substrate marked with either repellent or attractive short-lived pheromones. Our results show that the repellent pheromone effect lasts more than twice as long as the attractive pheromone… 

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