Debt and Foregone Medical Care

@article{Kalousov2013DebtAF,
  title={Debt and Foregone Medical Care},
  author={Lucie Kalousov{\'a} and Sarah A. Burgard},
  journal={Journal of Health and Social Behavior},
  year={2013},
  volume={54},
  pages={204 - 220}
}
Most American households carry debt, yet we have little understanding of how debt influences health behavior, especially health care seeking. We examined associations between foregone medical care and debt using a population-based sample of 914 southeastern Michigan residents surveyed in the wake of the late-2000s recession. Overall debt and ratios of debt to income and debt to assets were positively associated with foregoing medical or dental care in the past 12 months, even after adjusting… 
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