Debris disks as signposts of terrestrial planet formation

@article{Raymond2011DebrisDA,
  title={Debris disks as signposts of terrestrial planet formation},
  author={Sean N. Raymond and Philip J. Armitage and Amaya Moro-Mart'in and Mark Booth and Mark C. Wyatt and John Charles Armstrong and Avi M. Mandell and Franck Selsis and Andrew A. West},
  journal={Astronomy and Astrophysics},
  year={2011},
  volume={530}
}
There exists strong circumstantial evidence from their eccentric orbits that most of the known extra-solar planetary systems are the survivors of violent dynamical instabilities. Here we explore the effect of giant planet instabilities on the formation and survival of terrestrial planets. We numerically simulate the evolution of planetary systems around Sun-like stars that include three components: (i) an inner disk of planetesimals and planetary embryos; (ii) three giant planets at Jupiter… Expand
Debris disks as signposts of terrestrial planet formation - II. Dependence of exoplanet architectures on giant planet and disk properties
We present models for the formation of terrestrial planets, and the collisional evolution of debris disks, in planetary systems that contain multiple marginally unstable gas giants. We previousl yExpand
The debris disk – terrestrial planet connection
Abstract The eccentric orbits of the known extrasolar giant planets provide evidence that most planet-forming environments undergo violent dynamical instabilities. Here, we numerically simulate theExpand
Formation of terrestrial planets in eccentric and inclined giant planet systems
Evidence of mutually inclined planetary orbits has been reported for giant planets these last years. Here we aim to study the impact of eccentric and inclined massive giant planets on the terrestrialExpand
Scenarios of giant planet formation and evolution and their impact on the formation of habitable terrestrial planets
  • A. Morbidelli
  • Physics, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
  • 2014
TLDR
It is concluded that Earth-like planets should not expect to be typical in terms of physical and orbital properties and accretion history, and most habitable worlds are probably different, exotic worlds. Expand
EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON SURVIVAL OF TERRESTRIAL PLANETS
The orbital distributions of currently observed extrasolar giant planets allow marginally stable orbits for hypothetical, terrestrial planets. In this paper, we propose that many of these systems mayExpand
Debris Disks: Probing Planet Formation
Debris disks are the dust disks found around ~20% of nearby main sequence stars in far-IR surveys. They can be considered as descendants of protoplanetary disks or components of planetary systems,Expand
Formation of planetary systems by pebble accretion and migration: growth of gas giants
Giant planets migrate though the protoplanetary disc as they grow their solid core and attract their gaseous envelope. Previously, we have studied the growth and migration of an isolated planet in anExpand
Survival of habitable planets in unstable planetary systems
Many observed giant planets lie on eccentric orbits. Such orbits could be the result of strong scatterings with other giant planets. The same dynamical instability that produces giant planetExpand
Mini-Oort clouds: compact isotropic planetesimal clouds from planet–planet scattering
Starting from planetary systems with three giant planets and an outer disk of planetesimals, we use dynamical simulations to show how dynamical instabilities can transform planetesimal disks intoExpand
Effects of Dynamical Evolution of Giant Planets on the Delivery of Atmophile Elements During Terrestrial Planet Formation
Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar discs and planets beyond the Solar System. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected byExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 164 REFERENCES
Debris disks as signposts of terrestrial planet formation - II. Dependence of exoplanet architectures on giant planet and disk properties
We present models for the formation of terrestrial planets, and the collisional evolution of debris disks, in planetary systems that contain multiple marginally unstable gas giants. We previousl yExpand
Formation of Earth-like Planets During and After Giant Planet Migration
Close-in giant planets are thought to have formed in the cold outer regions of planetary systems and migrated inward, passing through the orbital parameter space occupied by the terrestrial planetsExpand
On the formation of terrestrial planets in hot-Jupiter systems
Context. There are numerous extrasolar giant planets which orbit close to their central stars. These “hot-Jupiters” probably formed in the outer, cooler regions of their protoplanetary disks, andExpand
The Search for Other Earths: Limits on the Giant Planet Orbits That Allow Habitable Terrestrial Planets to Form
Gas giant planets are far easier than terrestrial planets to detect around other stars, and they are thought to form much more quickly than terrestrial planets. Thus, in systems with giant planets,Expand
PLANET-PLANET SCATTERING IN PLANETESIMAL DISKS
We study the final architecture of planetary systems that evolve under the combined effects of planet-planet and planetesimal scattering. Using N-body simulations we investigate the dynamics ofExpand
Dynamical Outcomes of Planet-Planet Scattering
Observations in the past decade have revealed extrasolar planets with a wide range of orbital semimajor axes and eccentricities. Based on the present understanding of planet formation via coreExpand
Debris disks: seeing dust, thinking of planetesimals and planets
Debris disks are optically thin, almost gas-free dusty disks observed around a significant fraction of main-sequence stars older than about 10 Myr. Since the circumstellar dust is short-lived, theExpand
Predictions for the correlation between giant and terrestrial extrasolar planets in dynamically evolved systems
The large eccentricities of many giant extrasolar planets may represent the endpoint of gravitational scattering in initially more crowded systems. If so, the early evolution of the giant planets isExpand
Planet-planet scattering in planetesimal disks II: Predictions for outer extrasolar planetary systems
We develop an idealized dynamical model to predict the typical properties of outer extrasolar planetary systems, at radii comparable to the Jupiter-to-Neptune region of the solar system. The model isExpand
Evolution of Debris Disks
Circumstellar dust exists around several hundred main sequence stars. For the youngest stars, that dust could be a remnant of the protoplanetary disk. Mostly it is inferred to be continuouslyExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...