Death by dissolution: Sediment saturation state as a mortality factor for juvenile bivalves

@article{Green2009DeathBD,
  title={Death by dissolution: Sediment saturation state as a mortality factor for juvenile bivalves},
  author={Mark A. Green and George G. Waldbusser and Shannon L. Reilly and Karla Emerson and Scott O'Donnell},
  journal={Limnology and Oceanography},
  year={2009},
  volume={54}
}
We show that death by dissolution is an important size‐dependent mortality factor for juvenile bivalves. Utilizing a new experimental design, we were able to replicate saturation states in sediments after values frequently encountered by Mercenaria mercenaria in coastal deposits (Ωaragonite = 0.4 and 0.6). When 0.2‐mm M. mercenaria were reared in sediments at Ωaragonite = 0.4 and 0.6, significant daily losses of living individuals occurred (14.0% and 14.4% d−1, respectively), relative to… 

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