Death-Feigning in Insects: Mechanism and Function of Tonic Immobility

@article{2021DeathFeigningII,
  title={Death-Feigning in Insects: Mechanism and Function of Tonic Immobility},
  author={},
  journal={Death-Feigning in Insects},
  year={2021}
}
  • Published 2021
  • Death-Feigning in Insects

Responses to artificial selection for locomotor activity: A focus on death feigning in red flour beetle

The results imply genetic correlations between locomotor endurance, sprint speed and death feigning, but not with brain DA expression, suggesting that differences in the biogenic amine results of the authors' and previous studies may reflect differences in behavioural expression mechanisms.

Freezing or death feigning? Beetles selected for long death feigning showed different tactics against different predators

Abstract Prey evolve antipredator strategies against multiple enemies in nature. We examined how a prey species adopts different predation avoidance tactics against pursuit or sit‐and‐wait predators.

Genomic characterization between strains selected for death-feigning duration for avoiding attack of a beetle

This study suggests that many metabolic pathways and related genes may be involved in the decision-making process of anti-predator animal behavior by forming a network in addition to the tyrosine metabolic system, including dopamine, revealed in previous studies.

A cerebellar-prepontine circuit for tonic immobility triggered by an inescapable threat

It is demonstrated that a strong vibratory stimulus evokes tonic immobility in larval zebrafish defined by suppression of exploratory locomotion and sensorimotor responses, and cerebellar regulation of a neuropeptide-rich prepontine structure governs a conserved and ancestral defensive behavior triggered by inescapable threat.

Genes responsible for avoiding attack of a beetle, relating to the duration of death feigning

This study suggests that many metabolic pathways and related genes may be involved in the decision-making process of anti-predator animal behavior by forming a network in addition to the tyrosine metabolic system, including dopamine, revealed in previous studies.

Polygene control and trait dominance in death-feigning syndrome in the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum

The results suggest that death-feigning syndrome is controlled in a polygenic manner and indicated that reciprocal crossing experiments are useful in assessing the quantitative inheritance of behavioral traits.