Dealing with conflicting information: young children's reliance on what they see versus what they are told.

@article{Ma2010DealingWC,
  title={Dealing with conflicting information: young children's reliance on what they see versus what they are told.},
  author={Lili Ma and Patricia A Ganea},
  journal={Developmental science},
  year={2010},
  volume={13 1},
  pages={
          151-60
        }
}
Children often learn about the world through direct observation. However, much of children's knowledge is acquired through the testimony of others. This research investigates how preschoolers weigh these two sources of information when they are in conflict. Children watched as an adult hid a toy in one location. Then the adult told children that the toy was in a different location (i.e. false testimony). When retrieving the toy, 4- and 5-year-olds relied on what they had seen and disregarded… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
Chinese preschool and elementary schoolchildren were presented with five different-sized Russian dolls and asked to indicate the heaviest doll, and typically endorsed the experimenter’s claim even when it was counterintuitive. Expand
Preschool Children Rarely Seek Empirical Data That Could Help Them Complete a Task When Observation and Testimony Conflict.
TLDR
Children struggled to disregard the misleading testimony both when sorting the figurines and when asked about a future attempt, while children who explored the effectiveness of the figurine dismissed the misleading testified. Expand
Can't stop believing: inhibitory control and resistance to misleading testimony.
TLDR
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Why do Infants Look at and Use Positive Information from Some Informants Rather Than Others in Ambiguous Situations?
  • Gunilla Stenberg
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Infancy : the official journal of the International Society on Infant Studies
  • 2012
TLDR
It is suggested that novelty does not increase looking in ambiguous situations and the results support the expertise perspective of infant looking preferences. Expand
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