Deadly hairs, lethal feathers – convergent evolution of poisonous integument in mammals and birds

@article{Plikus2014DeadlyHL,
  title={Deadly hairs, lethal feathers – convergent evolution of poisonous integument in mammals and birds},
  author={Maksim V. Plikus and Aliaksandr A Astrowski},
  journal={Experimental Dermatology},
  year={2014},
  volume={23}
}
Hairs and feathers are textbook examples of the convergent evolution of the follicular appendage structure between mammals and birds. While broadly recognized for their convergent thermoregulatory, camouflage and sexual display functions, hairs and feathers are rarely thought of as deadly defence tools. Several recent studies, however, show that in some species of mammals and birds, the integument can, in fact, be a de facto lethal weapon. One mammalian example is provided by African crested… 
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