De sphaera of Johannes de Sacrobosco in the Early Modern Period

@inproceedings{Valleriani2020DeSO,
  title={De sphaera of Johannes de Sacrobosco in the Early Modern Period},
  author={Matteo Valleriani},
  year={2020}
}
By way of introduction to the present volume, a corpus of 359 treatises is described that was used in early modern educational institutions for introductory classes on cosmology and that is referenced by the following contributions. Following a taxonomy of early modern commentaries, central characteristics are analyzed in detail such as the rate of production of the treatises, the places where they were produced, and their various languages and formats. The focus then turns to the balance… Expand
3 Citations
Evolution and Transformation of Scientific Knowledge over the Sphaera Corpus: A Network Study
TLDR
The evolution and transformation of scientific knowledge in the early modern period, analyzing more than 350 different editions of textbooks used for teaching astronomy in European universities from the late fifteenth century to mid-seventeenth century, reveals the emergence of five different communities. Expand
Evolution and transformation of early modern cosmological knowledge: a network study
TLDR
The evolution and transformation of scientific knowledge in the early modern period, analyzing more than 350 different editions of textbooks used for teaching astronomy in European universities from the late fifteenth century to mid-seventeenth century, reveals the emergence of five different communities. Expand
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