De Novo Absence Status Epilepticus as a Benzodiazepine Withdrawal Syndrome

@article{Thomas1993DeNA,
  title={De Novo Absence Status Epilepticus as a Benzodiazepine Withdrawal Syndrome},
  author={Pierre Thomas and Christine Lebrun and Marcel Chatel},
  journal={Epilepsia},
  year={1993},
  volume={34}
}
Summary: A 67‐year‐old woman with a history of psychotropic drug abuse developed confusion. EEG was consistent with absence status epilepticus (AS). Intravenous (i.v.) flumazenil 1 mg, a benzodiazepine antagonist with anticonvulsant properties, increased both confusion and paroxysmal activity. Complete resolution was obtained after diazepam was administered i.v., and the patient then admitted that she had abruptly discontinued long‐standing treatment with carpipramine, amitryptiline, bromazepam… 

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