David Walker, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and the Logic of Sentimental Terror

@article{Pelletier2013DavidWH,
  title={David Walker, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and the Logic of Sentimental Terror},
  author={Kevin Pelletier},
  journal={African American Review},
  year={2013},
  volume={46},
  pages={255 - 269}
}
This essay departs from the scholarly tradition that equates black violence with revolutionary selfhood in order to return to the rhetoric of terror that is so emblematic of Walker’s Appeal. By situating slave rebellion within an eschatological framework (and not a revolutionary one) and insisting that acts of insurrection were part of apocalyptic prophecy in which God commissions violent retribution against slaveholders, Walker attempts in the Appeal to inspire a profound sense of fear that… Expand
Unsentimental Historicizing: The Neo-Slave Narrative Tradition and the Refusal of Feeling
Rooted partially in the US sentimental tradition, neo-slave narratives often feature lyrical language, emphasize the emotional experience of enslaved characters, and evoke the reader’s sympathy andExpand
MEETING AT THE THRESHOLD: SLAVERY’S INFLUENCE ON HOSPITALITY AND BLACK PERSONHOOD IN LATE-ANTEBELLUM AMERICAN LITERATURE
OF DISSERTATION MEETING AT THE THRESHOLD: SLAVERY’S INFLUENCE ON HOSPITALITY AND BLACK PERSONHOOD IN LATE-ANTEBELLUM AMERICAN LITERATURE In my dissertation, I argue that both white and black authorsExpand

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 19 REFERENCES
Sentimental Twain: Samuel Clemens in the Maze of Moral Philosophy
In Sentimental Twain, Gregg Camfield examines the major and minor works of Mark Twain to redraw the boundaries between sentimentalism and realism in the second half of the nineteenth century.Expand
Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp
Harriet Beecher Stowe's second antislavery novel was written partly in response to the criticisms of ""Uncle Tom's Cabin"" (1852) by both white Southerners and black abolitionists. In ""Dred""Expand
Stowe's Rainbow Sign: Violence and Community in Dred: A Tale of the Great Dismal Swamp (1856)
IBEGiN with James Baldwin's famous epigraph and title to his civil rights' jeremiad, The Fire Next Time, to challenge our scholarly and critical understanding of Harriet Beecher Stowe, passionateExpand
Spaces of Democracy in Harriet Beecher Stowe's Dred
By the mid nineteenth century, the persistence of the domestic slave trade, along with the passage of the Fugitive Slave Law and the Kansas-Nebraska Act, suggested that the abolition of slavery wasExpand
Denmark Vesey and His Co-Conspirators
I N the pantheon of rebels against slavery in the United States, Denmark Vesey stands exalted. Historians celebrate this free black carpenter who organized slaves to emancipate themselves in I822 byExpand
Dred: Intemperate Slavery
In 1825, Harriet Beecher Stowe's father, Lyman Beecher, gave a series of six sermons which helped to launch the temperance movement. In these sermons, published in 1826 and much reprinted thereafter,Expand
The Slumbering Volcano: American Slave Ship Revolts and the Production of Rebellious Masculinity
In The Slumbering Volcano, Maggie Montesinos Sale investigates depictions of nineteenth-century slave ship revolts to explore the notion of rebellion in formulations of United States nationalExpand
Dislocating Race and Nation: Episodes in Nineteenth-Century American Literary Nationalism
This title presents literary responses to questions of U.S. racial nationalism and imperialism.American literary nationalism is traditionally understood as a cohesive literary tradition developed inExpand
To Wake the Nations: Race in the Making of American Literature.
This powerful book argues that White culture in America does not exist apart from Black culture. The revolution of the rights of man that established America collided long ago with the system ofExpand
Designs against Charleston : the trial record of the Denmark Vesey Slave Conspiracy of 1822
On July 2, 1822, officials in Charleston, South Carolina, executed a free black carpenter named Denmark Vesey for planning what would have been the most extensive slave revolt in U.S. history. OnlyExpand
...
1
2
...