David Rentz: A guide to the katydids of Australia

@article{New2010DavidRA,
  title={David Rentz: A guide to the katydids of Australia},
  author={Tim R New},
  journal={Journal of Insect Conservation},
  year={2010},
  volume={14},
  pages={579-580}
}
  • T. New
  • Published 2010
  • Biology
  • Journal of Insect Conservation
Katydids (also known as ‘long-horned grasshoppers’ or ‘bush-crickets’, amidst a variety of other common names that may infer spurious relationships with other groups of Orthoptera) are the members of the distinctive family Tettigoniidae, one of the largest families in the order and with a rich Australian fauna exceeding a thousand species. David Rentz is acknowledged globally as the leading authority on these insects, and is a prolific writer on their systematics; his projected series of… Expand
Bioacoustic and biophysical analysis of a newly described highly transparent genus of predatory katydids from the Andean cloud forest (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae: Meconematinae: Phlugidini)
ABSTRACT Transparency is a greatly advantageous form of camouflage, allowing species to passively avoid detection regardless of the properties of the surface which they occupy. However, it isExpand

References

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Tettigoniidae of Australia Volume 1: The Tettigoniinae
This volume deals with the shield-backed katydids, the Tettigoniinae, covering 17 genera and 72 species. The use of tribes has been disregarded until generic classification is made on a worldwideExpand
Tettigoniidae of Australia Volume 3: Listroscelidinae, Tympanophorinae, Meconematinae and Microtettigoniinae
This third volume in the series will assist with identification and study of this important genus. Specialised collecting techniques, and the rearing of immature specimens, have yielded many moreExpand
Tettigoniidae of Australia Volume 2: Austrosaginae, Zaprochilinae and Phasmodinae
TLDR
Evidence suggests that only pollen and nectar are eaten and the flower remains intact in the Phasmodinae, a small group with one genus and four species living in the heath habitats of Western Australia. Expand