Dating of the human-ape splitting by a molecular clock of mitochondrial DNA

@article{Hasegawa2005DatingOT,
  title={Dating of the human-ape splitting by a molecular clock of mitochondrial DNA},
  author={Masami Hasegawa and Hirohisa Kishino and Taka-aki Yano},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={22},
  pages={160-174}
}
SummaryA new statistical method for estimating divergence dates of species from DNA sequence data by a molecular clock approach is developed. This method takes into account effectively the information contained in a set of DNA sequence data. The molecular clock of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was calibrated by setting the date of divergence between primates and ungulates at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (65 million years ago), when the extinction of dinosaurs occurred. A generalized… 
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