Data Decisiveness, Missing Entries, and the DD Index

@article{DeLaet1999DataDM,
  title={Data Decisiveness, Missing Entries, and the DD Index},
  author={Jan De Laet and Erik Smets},
  journal={Cladistics},
  year={1999},
  volume={15}
}
The decisiveness of a data set has been defined as the degree to which all possible dichotomous trees for that data set differ in length, and the DD statistic (the data decisiveness index) has been proposed to measure this degree. In this paper, we first discuss an exact nonre cursive formula for the length of indecisive datasets (DD = 0) that consist of informative binary characters in which no missing entries are allowed. Next, the concept of indecisive data sets is extended to data sets in… 
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