Dart receipt promotes sperm storage in the garden snail Helix aspersa

@article{Rogers2001DartRP,
  title={Dart receipt promotes sperm storage in the garden snail Helix aspersa},
  author={David W. Rogers and Ronald Chase},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2001},
  volume={50},
  pages={122-127}
}
Abstract. During courtship, many helicid snails attempt to pierce the body walls of their mating partners with mucus-coated calcareous darts. The mucus covering the dart induces conformational changes in the female reproductive tract of the recipient, closing off the entrance to the gametolytic bursa copulatrix. We have tested the effect of dart receipt on the number of sperm stored by once-mated snails, Helix aspersa. Snails that were hit by darts stored significantly more sperm than did… Expand

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