Daniel John Cunningham (1850–1909): anatomist and textbook author, whose sons achieved distinction in the Army, Navy and Indian Medical Service

@article{Kaufman2008DanielJC,
  title={Daniel John Cunningham (1850–1909): anatomist and textbook author, whose sons achieved distinction in the Army, Navy and Indian Medical Service},
  author={Matthew Kaufman},
  journal={Journal of Medical Biography},
  year={2008},
  volume={16},
  pages={30 - 35}
}
  • M. Kaufman
  • Published 2008
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Medical Biography
Summary Daniel John Cunningham was a son of the manse. His father John (1819–93) was the parish priest at Crieff, Perthshire from 1845 and was to remain there for 41 years. In 1886 he was appointed Principal of St Mary's College of the University of St Andrews and Moderator of the Church of Scotland. Daniel was educated at Crieff Academy before he progressed to the University of Edinburgh. He graduated MB CM with First-class Honours in 1874 and then proceeded MD in 1876 when he was awarded a… Expand
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