Dancing with Jim Crow: The Chattanooga Embarrassment of the Methodist Episcopal Church

@article{Harris2019DancingWJ,
  title={Dancing with Jim Crow: The Chattanooga Embarrassment of the Methodist Episcopal Church},
  author={Paul William Harris},
  journal={The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era},
  year={2019},
  volume={18},
  pages={155 - 173}
}
  • P. Harris
  • Published 8 March 2019
  • History
  • The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era
Abstract After the Civil War, northern Methodists undertook a successful mission to recruit a biracial membership in the South. Their Freedmen's Aid Society played a key role in outreach to African Americans, but when the denomination decided to use Society funds in aid of schools for Southern whites, a national controversy erupted over the refusal of Chattanooga University to admit African Americans. Caught between a principled commitment to racial brotherhood and the pressures of expediency… 

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