Dance dialects and foraging range in three Asian honey bee species

@article{Dyer2004DanceDA,
  title={Dance dialects and foraging range in three Asian honey bee species},
  author={Fred C. Dyer and Thomas D Seeley},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={28},
  pages={227-233}
}
  • F. Dyer, T. Seeley
  • Published 1 April 1991
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
SummaryWe measured the “distance dialects” in the dance languages of three honey bee species in Thailand (Apis florea, A. cerana, and A. dorsata), and used these dialects to examine the hypothesis that a colony's dialect is adaptively “tuned” to enhance efficiency of communication over the distances that its foragers typically fly. in contrast to previous interspecific comparisons in Sri Lanka (Lindauer 1956; Punchihewa et al. 1985), we found no striking dialect differences among the Asian bees… 
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