Damage control resuscitation: directly addressing the early coagulopathy of trauma.

@article{Holcomb2007DamageCR,
  title={Damage control resuscitation: directly addressing the early coagulopathy of trauma.},
  author={John B. Holcomb and Donald H. Jenkins and Peter M. Rhee and Jay A. Johannigman and Peter F. Mahoney and Sumeru Ghanshyam Mehta and E Darrin Cox and Michael J Gehrke and Gregory J Beilman and Martin A. Schreiber and Stephen Flaherty and Kurt W. Grathwohl and Phillip C. Spinella and Jeremy G. Perkins and Alec C. Beekley and Neil R. McMullin and Myung S. Park and Ernest A. Gonzalez and Charles E. Wade and Michael A. Dubick and Charles William Schwab and Fredrick A Moore and Howard R. Champion and David B. Hoyt and John R. Hess},
  journal={The Journal of trauma},
  year={2007},
  volume={62 2},
  pages={
          307-10
        }
}
Abstract : Rapid progress in trauma care occurs when the results of translational research are promptly integrated into clinical practice. Experience with a high volume of severely injured casualties expedites the process. Historically, these conditions have converged during times of conflict, improving the care of combat casualties and subsequently that of civilian trauma patients. In the most severely injured casualties, we know that when the lethal triad of hypothermia, acidosis, and… 

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