Dairy Product, Saturated Fatty Acid, and Calcium Intake and Prostate Cancer in a Prospective Cohort of Japanese Men

@article{Kurahashi2008DairyPS,
  title={Dairy Product, Saturated Fatty Acid, and Calcium Intake and Prostate Cancer in a Prospective Cohort of Japanese Men},
  author={Norie Kurahashi and Manami Inoue and Motoki Iwasaki and Shizuka Sasazuki and And Shoichiro Tsugane},
  journal={Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers \& Prevention},
  year={2008},
  volume={17},
  pages={930 - 937}
}
Many epidemiologic studies have reported a positive association between dairy products and prostate cancer. Calcium or saturated fatty acid in dairy products has been suspected as the causative agent. To investigate the association between dairy products, calcium, and saturated fatty acid and prostate cancer in Japan, where both the intake of these items and the incidence of prostate cancer are low, we conducted a population-based prospective study in 43,435 Japanese men ages 45 to 74 years… 

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