Daily music exposure dose and hearing problems using personal listening devices in adolescents and young adults: A systematic review

@article{Jiang2016DailyME,
  title={Daily music exposure dose and hearing problems using personal listening devices in adolescents and young adults: A systematic review},
  author={Wen Jiang and Fei Zhao and Nicola Guderley and Vinaya Manchaiah},
  journal={International Journal of Audiology},
  year={2016},
  volume={55},
  pages={197 - 205}
}
Abstract Objective: This systematic review aimed to explore the evidence on whether the preferred listening levels (PLLs) and durations of music listening through personal listening devices (PLDs) in adolescents and young adults exceed the current recommended 100% daily noise dose; together with the impact on hearing and possible influential factors of such listening behaviours. Design: A systematic search was conducted using multiple online bibliographic databases. Study sample: The 26 studies… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Results confirmed the feasibility of monitoring listening habits by a smartphone application, and underscore the need for such a tool to enable safe listening behaviour.
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TLDR
It is demonstrated for the first time that the sound component at 100 Hz with more than 46.6 dB in music improved balance in young adults.
Risk Assessment of Recreational Noise-Induced Hearing Loss from Exposure through a Personal Audio System-iPod Touch.
TLDR
These results provide quantifiable information regarding safe volume control settings on the iPod Touch with standard earbuds and indicate significant worsening of pure-tone thresholds following music exposure only in the group that was exposed to 100% volume at the following frequencies.
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