Daily intake of a formulated tomato drink affects carotenoid plasma and lymphocyte concentrations and improves cellular antioxidant protection

@article{Porrini2005DailyIO,
  title={Daily intake of a formulated tomato drink affects carotenoid plasma and lymphocyte concentrations and improves cellular antioxidant protection},
  author={Marisa Porrini and Patrizia Riso and Antonella Brusamolino and Cristiana Berti and Serena Guarnieri and Francesco Visioli},
  journal={British Journal of Nutrition},
  year={2005},
  volume={93},
  pages={93 - 99}
}
The salutary characteristics of the tomato are normally related to its content of carotenoids, especially lycopene, and other antioxidants. Our purpose was to verify whether the daily intake of a beverage prototype called Lyc-o-Mato® containing a natural tomato extract (Lyc-o-Mato® oleoresin 6 %) was able to modify plasma and lymphocyte carotenoid concentrations, particularly those of lycopene, phytoene, phytofluene and β-carotene, and to evaluate whether this intake was sufficient to improve… 
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TLDR
The results suggest that tomato products are not only good sources of lycopene but also sources of bioavailable vitamin C and may originate from the synergism of different antioxidants present in tomatoes.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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