Daily fluctuation of urine serotonin and cortisol in healthy shelter dogs and influence of intraspecific social exposure

@article{Alberghina2019DailyFO,
  title={Daily fluctuation of urine serotonin and cortisol in healthy shelter dogs and influence of intraspecific social exposure},
  author={Daniela Alberghina and Giuseppe Piccione and G. Pumilia and Mauro Gio{\`e} and Maria Rizzo and Pierluigi Raffo and Michele Panzera},
  journal={Physiology \& Behavior},
  year={2019},
  volume={206},
  pages={1-6}
}
Serotonin and Tryptophan Serum Concentrations in Shelter Dogs Showing Different Behavioural Responses to a Potentially Stressful Procedure
TLDR
Serum 5-HT levels do not seem to be associated with dogs’ behavioural response to a stressful situation nor with serum TRP concentrations, and the relationship between serum TRp and 5- HT concentrations and behaviour needs further research.
Short-term effect of ovariohysterectomy on urine serotonin, cortisol, testosterone and progesterone in bitches
TLDR
The bitches had significantly lower levels of cortisol, testosterone, and progesterone 1 week after ovariohysterectomy compared with before and the levels stayed low throughout the study and Interestingly, serotonin levels tended to increase 4 weeks after surgery.
Sex of Walker Influences Scent-marking Behavior of Shelter Dogs
TLDR
Evidence indicates that shelter dogs behave differently in the presence of unfamiliar men and women, and it is suggested that researchers conducting behavioral studies of dogs record, consider in analyses, and report the sex of observers and handlers as standard practice.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 38 REFERENCES
Circadian Rhythm of Cortisol Secretion in Dogs of Different Daily Activities
TLDR
The results suggest that cortisol concentrations in the dog are subject to considerable changes during the day, and depending on the characteristics of day and night activities a diurnal rhythm can be found in some dogs.
Behavioural and hormonal indicators of enduring environmental stress in dogs
TLDR
Chronic stress in dogs may be identified by increased paw lifting when animals are not disturbed and by ample behavioural expressions of arousal when they are mildly stimulated, since some behaviours may occur in contexts not related to stress.
The Use of Saliva Cortisol, Urinary Cortisol, and Catecholamine Measurements for a Noninvasive Assessment of Stress Responses in Dogs
TLDR
The present experiment provides strong support for using saliva sampling and urine collection as noninvasive methods to establish stress-induced cortisol responses, and for measuring acute plasma adrenaline responses, measuring A/C ratios may not be a valid alternative.
...
1
2
3
4
...