Dahomey and the Slave Trade: Reflections on the Historiography of the Rise of Dahomey

@article{Law1986DahomeyAT,
  title={Dahomey and the Slave Trade: Reflections on the Historiography of the Rise of Dahomey},
  author={R. C. C. Law},
  journal={The Journal of African History},
  year={1986},
  volume={27},
  pages={237 - 267}
}
  • R. Law
  • Published 1 July 1986
  • History
  • The Journal of African History
The rise of the kingdom of Dahomey coincided with the growth of the slave trade in the area, and consequently has often served as a case study of the impact of the slave trade upon African societies. The article reviews the historiography of the rise of Dahomey, in an attempt to clarify the relationship between the nature of the Dahomian state and its participation in the slave trade. It considers, and refutes, the view that the rulers of Dahomey had originally intended to bring the slave trade… 

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