DSM-5: An Overview of Changes and Controversies

@article{Wakefield2013DSM5AO,
  title={DSM-5: An Overview of Changes and Controversies},
  author={Jerome C. Wakefield},
  journal={Clinical Social Work Journal},
  year={2013},
  volume={41},
  pages={139-154}
}
  • J. Wakefield
  • Published 2013
  • Psychology
  • Clinical Social Work Journal
The DSM-5 offers many changes in the criteria and categories used in clinical diagnosis. The provocative and sometimes controversial nature of the changes has enlivened debate in the mental health field about how we should best understand our clients. I selectively survey what is new in DSM-5, why changes were made, and what about them is so controversial. First, I summarize the main metastructural and organizational changes, including elimination of the multiaxial system and changed chapter… Expand
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