DRIVING WHILE BLACK: EFFECTS OF RACE, ETHNICITY, AND GENDER ON CITIZEN SELF‐REPORTS OF TRAFFIC STOPS AND POLICE ACTIONS*

@article{Lundman2003DRIVINGWB,
  title={DRIVING WHILE BLACK: EFFECTS OF RACE, ETHNICITY, AND GENDER ON CITIZEN SELF‐REPORTS OF TRAFFIC STOPS AND POLICE ACTIONS*},
  author={Richard J. Lundman and Robert L. Kaufman},
  journal={Criminology},
  year={2003},
  volume={41},
  pages={195-220}
}
Are African-American men, compared with white men, more likely to report being stopped by police for traffic law violations? Are African-American men and Hispanic drivers less likely to report that police had a legitimate reason for the stop and less likely to report that police acted properly? This study answers these questions using citizen self-reports of their traffic stop encounters with the police. Net of other important explanatory variables, the data indicate that police make traffic… 

Tables from this paper

Traffic Stop Encounters: Officer and Citizen Race and Perceptions of Police Propriety
The continued legacy of racism and discrimination contribute to racial and ethnic differences in attitudes about the police. This research investigates citizen reports of proper police behavior
Traffic stops, race, and perceptions of fairness
ABSTRACT Traffic stops are the most common reason for face-to-face encounters between police officers and citizens. Contact with police can affect citizens’ behaviour toward the police, particularly
Self-reports of Police Speeding Stops by Race: Results from the North Carolina Reverse Record Check Survey
Survey reports of police stops and driving behavior are a potential methodology for examining the magnitude and prevalence of the “Driving While Black” phenomena. However, estimates of the magnitude
Race and Ethnicity Missingness in the Traffic Stop Data Reported by 308 Massachusetts Police Agencies
Data reported by police agencies were at the core of most analyses of Driving While Black in the 1990s and 2000s. There is, however, no previous macro-level research directed exclusively at the
Police Stops, Pretext, and Racial Profiling: Explaining Warning and Ticket Stops Using Citizen Self-Reports
ABSTRACT This study examines the relationship between driver's social status characteristics, including race, and the likelihood of different types of traffic stops—warnings and tickets—by using
Race-Based Decisions: Traffic Citations and Municipal Court Dispositions
Numerous studies have demonstrated that race can affect a police officer’s decision to stop and ticket a motorist. With a large sample of traffic cases from a major city in the Pacific Northwest, the
Driving While Black: A Comparison of the Beliefs, Concerns, and Behaviors of Black and White Maryland Drivers
TLDR
Findings indicate that black drivers are not more likely to be ticketed, despite perceptual biases that may exist among some drivers, which are explained by demographic as well as regional factors.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 37 REFERENCES
DEMEANOR OR CRIME? WHY “HOSTILE” CITIZENS ARE MORE LIKELY TO BE ARRESTED*
It is a criminological axiom that displays of hostility by citizens towards police officers directly increase the odds of arrest in police-citizen encounters. This axiom rests on nearly three decades
Searching for the Denominator: Problems with Police Traffic Stop Data and an Early Warning System Solution
In response to widespread allegations of racial and ethnic discrimination in traffic stops, a practice that has been labeled “racial profiling,” law enforcement agencies are now collecting data on
Race and place: The ecology of racial profiling African American motorists
We propose an ecological dimension to racial profiling by comparing the distribution of drivers on the roadways with officers' proactive surveillance and stop behavior in a predominantly white
DEMEANOR OR CRIME? THE MIDWEST CITY POLICE-CITIZEN ENCOUNTERS STUDY*
There is agreement in the literature on policing that demeanor and other extralegal variables help determine police decisions. A recent challenge to that agreement has been issued, however. Klinger
Causes of Police Behavior: the Current State of Quantitative Research
This paper is a first attempt to organize and codify the findings of quantitative research on four aspects of police behavior: detection, arrest, service, and violence. A framework of five
PERCEPTIONS OF RACIAL PROFILING: RACE, CLASS, AND PERSONAL EXPERIENCE
Racial profiling by the police has become an increasingly controversial issue in recent years, but we know little about the extent of the problem and even less about public perceptions of profiling.
Violence and the Police
A case-study of a municipal police force in the United States suggests that the illegal use of violence by the police is a consequence of their occupational experience and that the policeman's
You can lead a horse to water …: A case study of a police department's response to stricter drunk-driving laws
We present a case study illustrating the complexity of the process that determines how vigorously local police agencies enforce recent drunk-driving laws. Police enforcement practices are influenced
The Effects of “Tough” Drunk Driving Laws on Policing: A Case Study
In 1982, California passed into law severe sanctions for driving while intoxicated. The effects of these law changes on policing were investigated. Using limited time series and elite interview
...
1
2
3
4
...