DNA repair mechanisms protect our genome from carcinogenesis.

@article{Moraes2012DNARM,
  title={DNA repair mechanisms protect our genome from carcinogenesis.},
  author={Maria Carolina Strano Moraes and Januario Bispo Cabral Neto and Carlos Frederico Martins Menck},
  journal={Frontiers in bioscience},
  year={2012},
  volume={17},
  pages={
          1362-88
        }
}
Human cells are constantly exposed to DNA damage. Without repair, damage can result in genetic instability and eventually cancer. The strong association between the lack of DNA damage repair, mutations and cancer is dramatically demonstrated by a number of cancer-prone human syndromes, such as xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), ataxia-telangiectasia (AT) and Fanconi anemia (FA). This review focuses on the historical discoveries related with these three diseases and describes their impact on the… 

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