DNA profiles of the eastern Canadian wolf and the red wolf provide evidence for a common evolutionary history independent of the gray wolf

@article{Wilson2000DNAPO,
  title={DNA profiles of the eastern Canadian wolf and the red wolf provide evidence for a common evolutionary history independent of the gray wolf},
  author={Paul J Wilson and Sonya K. Grewal and I Lawford and Jennifer N.M. Heal and Angela G. Granacki and David S. Pennock and John B. Theberge and Mary T. Theberge and Dennis R. Voigt and William T. Waddell and Robert E. Chambers and Paul C Paquet and Gloria Goulet and Dean H. Cluff and Bradley N. White},
  journal={Canadian Journal of Zoology},
  year={2000},
  volume={78},
  pages={2156-2166}
}
The origin and taxonomy of the red wolf (Canis rufus) have been the subject of considerable debate and it has been suggested that this taxon was recently formed as a result of hybridization between the coyote and gray wolf. Like the red wolf, the eastern Canadian wolf has been characterized as a small "deer-eating" wolf that hybridizes with coyotes (Canis latrans). While studying the population of eastern Canadian wolves in Algonquin Provincial Park we recognized similarities to the red wolf… Expand

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