DNA barcodes and morphology reveal a hybrid hawkmoth in Tahiti (Lepidoptera : Sphingidae)

@article{Rougerie2012DNABA,
  title={DNA barcodes and morphology reveal a hybrid hawkmoth in Tahiti (Lepidoptera : Sphingidae)},
  author={Rodolphe Rougerie and Jean Haxaire and Ian J. Kitching and Paul D. N. Hebert},
  journal={Invertebrate Systematics},
  year={2012},
  volume={26},
  pages={445 - 450}
}
Abstract. Interspecific hybridisation is a rare but widespread phenomenon identified as a potential complicating factor for the identification of species through DNA barcoding. Hybrids can, however, also deceive morphology-based taxonomy, resulting in the description of invalid species based on hybrid specimens. As the result of an unexpected case of discordance between barcoding results and current morphology-based taxonomy, we discovered an example of such a hybrid ‘species’ in hawkmoths… 
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