DIVERSITY IN THE WEAPONS OF SEXUAL SELECTION: HORN EVOLUTION IN THE BEETLE GENUS ONTHOPHAGUS (COLEOPTERA: SCARABAEIDAE)

@article{Emlen2005DIVERSITYIT,
  title={DIVERSITY IN THE WEAPONS OF SEXUAL SELECTION: HORN EVOLUTION IN THE BEETLE GENUS ONTHOPHAGUS (COLEOPTERA: SCARABAEIDAE)},
  author={Douglas J. Emlen and Jennifer Marangelo and Bernard Ball and Clifford W. Cunningham},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={59}
}
Abstract Both ornaments and weapons of sexual selection frequently exhibit prolific interspecific diversity of form. Yet, most studies of this diversity have focused on ornaments involved with female mate choice, rather than on the weapons of male competition. With few exceptions, the mechanisms of divergence in weapon morphology remain largely unexplored. Here, we characterize the evolutionary radiation of one type of weapon: beetle horns. We use partial sequences from four nuclear and three… Expand
Population differences in the strength of sexual selection match relative weapon size in the Japanese rhinoceros beetle, Trypoxylus dichotomus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) †
TLDR
Observations of local habitat conditions and breeding ecology point to shifts in the relative abundance of feeding territories as the most likely cause of population differences in selection on male weapon size in this species. Expand
The evolution of relative trait size and shape: insights from the genitalia of dung beetles
TLDR
This hypothesis predicts that populations diverge faster in genital shape than in genital size, and is tested in males from 10 dung beetle species with known phylogenetic relationships from the genus Onthophagus. Expand
No fecundity cost of female secondary sexual trait expression in the horned beetle Onthophagus sagittarius
TLDR
A longevity cost of reproduction for females that was independent of horn expression was identified and the rate of increase in fecundity and horn expression with body size were equal, so that absolute horn size provides an accurate indicator of body size and maternal quality. Expand
Insights into the Development and Evolution of Exaggerated Traits Using De Novo Transcriptomes of Two Species of Horned Scarab Beetles
TLDR
Using 454 pyrosequencing, transcriptome profiles are generated during horn growth and development in two different scarab beetle species: the Asian rhinoceros beetle, Trypoxylus dichotomus, and the dung beetle, Onthophagus nigriventris to look for signatures of molecular evolution. Expand
Feeding ecology and sexual dimorphism in a speciose flower beetle clade (Hopliini: Scarabaeidae)
TLDR
Phylogenetic data, in conjunction with behavioural data on the function of leg weaponry and visual signalling among males is needed to better understand the link between sexual dimorphism and sexual selection in the radiation of the monkey beetles. Expand
The evolution of tail weaponization in amniotes
TLDR
It is suggested that the evolution of tail weaponry is rare because large, armoured herbivores are uncommon in extant terrestrial faunas, as they have been throughout evolutionary history. Expand
The evolution of antennal courtship in diplazontine parasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Diplazontinae)
TLDR
This study provides the first comparative evidence for a tight correlation between male-specific antennal modifications and the use of the antennae during courtship, implying low levels of homoplasy and a comparatively low speed of evolution. Expand
Precise staging of beetle horn formation in Trypoxylus dichotomus reveals the pleiotropic roles of doublesex depending on the spatiotemporal developmental contexts
TLDR
It is revealed that dsx regulates different aspects of morphogenetic activities during the prepupal and pupal developmental stages to form appropriate morphologies of pupal head and thoracic horn primordia as well as those of adult horns. Expand
Phylogeny and evolution of life-history strategies in the Sycophaginae non-pollinating fig wasps (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea)
TLDR
This phylogeny is used to reconstruct the evolution of Sycophaginae life-history strategies and test if the presence of winged males and small brood size may be correlated, and shows that the two traits are evolutionary labile. Expand
Diversification of doublesex function underlies morph-, sex-, and species-specific development of beetle horns
TLDR
It is shown that the sex-determination gene doublesex (dsx) underlies important aspects of horn development, including differences between sexes, morphs, and species, and suggests that dsx function has been coopted to facilitate both the evolution of environmentally-cued intrasexual dimorphisms and rapid species divergences in a novel trait. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 171 REFERENCES
Phylogenetic evidence for multiple losses of a sexually selected character in phrynosomatid lizards
  • J. Wiens
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1999
TLDR
A phylogenetic approach was used to examine macro–evolutionary patterns of change in sexually dichromatic display coloration among 130 taxa of phrynosomatid lizards and showed repeated losses of sexual dimorphism, which occur through losses of conspicuous male coloration or gains of conspicuous female coloration. Expand
Phylogenetic Tests of Alternative Intersexual Selection Mechanisms: Trait Macroevolution in a Polygynous Clade (Aves: Pipridae)
  • R. Prum
  • Biology
  • The American Naturalist
  • 1997
TLDR
The diverse repertoires and hierarchically distributed traits in the lekking manakin clade indicate that Fisherian selection may have played an important role in diversification of secondary sexual traits in other groups of polygynous animals. Expand
Sexual selection and sexual dimorphism in the harlequin beetle Acrocinus longimanus
TLDR
It is suggested that sexual selection in this species is sufficiently intense to override any effects of differing ecological factors. Expand
SEXUAL ISOLATION EVOLVES FASTER THAN HYBRID INVIABILITY IN A DIVERSE AND SEXUALLY DIMORPHIC GENUS OF FISH (PERCIDAE: ETHEOSTOMA)
  • T. Mendelson
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2003
TLDR
Results are consistent with the hypothesis that sexual selection for exaggerated mate‐recognition characters causes the relatively rapid evolution of sexual isolation, and support the prediction that sexual isolation will evolve more rapidly than other forms of reproductive isolation. Expand
Alternative reproductive tactics and male-dimorphism in the horned beetle Onthophagus acuminatus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
  • D. Emlen
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 1997
TLDR
Both overall body size and relative horn length significantly affected the outcome of fights over tunnel ownership, suggesting that alternative reproductive tactics may favor divergence in male horn morphology, with long horns favored in males large enough to guard tunnels, and hornlessness favored in smaller males that adopt the “sneaking” behavioral alternative. Expand
Pattern of ecological shifts in the diversification of Hawaiian Drosophila inferred from a molecular phylogeny
TLDR
It is concluded that much of the adaptive radiation into alternate breeding substrates occurred rapidly, early in the group's evolution in Hawaii, and this ecological divergence and the correlated changes in ovarian patterns that adapt species to their ecological habitats were contributing factors in the major phyletic branching within the Hawaiian drosophilid fauna. Expand
Phylogenetic Relationships of Iberian Dung Beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae): Insights on the Evolution of Nesting Behavior
TLDR
The results suggest tentative single origins for both the tunneling and the rolling behaviors, and the possibility that the rolling behavior could have been lost secondarily in Copris. Expand
Male horn dimorphism in the scarab beetle, Onthophagus taurus: do alternative reproductive tactics favour alternative phenotypes?
TLDR
Combined, the two alternative reproductive tactics used by male O. taurus appear to favour opposite horn phenotypes, which may explain the paucity of intermediate morphologies in natural populations of O. Taurus. Expand
Horn polyphenism in the beetle Onthophagus taurus: larval diet quality and plasticity in parental investment determine adult body size and male horn morphology
TLDR
It is demonstrated that natural variation in both the quantity and quality of food that larvae receive from their parents determines body size in males and females, and, by means of a threshold response, the presence or absence of horns in males. Expand
Assortative mating among rock‐dwelling cichlid fishes supports high estimates of species richness from Lake Malawi
TLDR
All taxa showed high levels of allelic diversity providing evidence that genetic bottlenecking may have been of limited importance in the speciation process, and assortative mating among taxa differing only in male colouration is supportive of theories that speciation in these fishes has been driven by sexual selection by female choice. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...