DIVERSITY IN THE WEAPONS OF SEXUAL SELECTION: HORN EVOLUTION IN THE BEETLE GENUS ONTHOPHAGUS (COLEOPTERA: SCARABAEIDAE)

@inproceedings{Emlen2005DIVERSITYIT,
  title={DIVERSITY IN THE WEAPONS OF SEXUAL SELECTION: HORN EVOLUTION IN THE BEETLE GENUS ONTHOPHAGUS (COLEOPTERA: SCARABAEIDAE)},
  author={Douglas J. Emlen and Jennifer Marangelo and Bernard Ball and Clifford W. Cunningham},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2005}
}
Abstract Both ornaments and weapons of sexual selection frequently exhibit prolific interspecific diversity of form. Yet, most studies of this diversity have focused on ornaments involved with female mate choice, rather than on the weapons of male competition. With few exceptions, the mechanisms of divergence in weapon morphology remain largely unexplored. Here, we characterize the evolutionary radiation of one type of weapon: beetle horns. We use partial sequences from four nuclear and three… 

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...

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