DIVERGENT ENVIRONMENTS AND POPULATION BOTTLENECKS FAIL TO GENERATE PREMATING ISOLATION IN DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA

@inproceedings{Rundle2003DIVERGENTEA,
  title={DIVERGENT ENVIRONMENTS AND POPULATION BOTTLENECKS FAIL TO GENERATE PREMATING ISOLATION IN DROSOPHILA PSEUDOOBSCURA},
  author={Howard D. Rundle},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2003}
}
  • H. Rundle
  • Published in
    Evolution; international…
    1 November 2003
  • Biology
Abstract While the feasibility of bottleneck-induced speciation is in doubt, population bottlenecks may still affect the speciation process by interacting with divergent selection. To explore this possibility, I conducted a laboratory speciation experiment using Drosophila pseudoobscura involving 78 replicate populations assigned in a two-way factorial design to both bottleneck (present vs. absent) and environment (ancestral vs. novel) treatments. Populations independently evolved under these… 

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