DIKTYS OF CRETE

@article{Gainsford2012DIKTYSOC,
  title={DIKTYS OF CRETE},
  author={Peter Gainsford},
  journal={The Cambridge Classical Journal},
  year={2012},
  volume={58},
  pages={58 - 87}
}
  • Peter Gainsford
  • Published 31 October 2012
  • History
  • The Cambridge Classical Journal
‘Diktys of Crete’ is a fictionalised prose account of the Trojan War. It does not enjoy a high profile in modern thought, but looms large in Byzantine and mediaeval histories of the Troy matter. Although the ‘Latin Dictys’ has enjoyed a moderate revival in recent scholarship, the Byzantine testimony to Diktys is still badly neglected. The present article focuses on: (1) a general overview of the Greek Diktys, including up-to-date information on dating; (2) a comprehensive list of witnesses to… 
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