DIFFERENTIAL AVOIDANCE OF CORAL SNAKE BANDED PATTERNS BY FREE‐RANGING AVIAN PREDATORS IN COSTA RICA

@article{Brodie1993DIFFERENTIALAO,
  title={DIFFERENTIAL AVOIDANCE OF CORAL SNAKE BANDED PATTERNS BY FREE‐RANGING AVIAN PREDATORS IN COSTA RICA},
  author={Edmund D. Brodie},
  journal={Evolution},
  year={1993},
  volume={47}
}
  • E. Brodie
  • Published 1 February 1993
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Evolution
Empirical studies of mimicry have rarely been conducted under natural conditions. Field investigations of some lepidopteran systems have provided a bridge between experiments examining artificial situations and the mimicry process in nature, but these systems do not include all types of mimicry. The presence of dangerous or deadly models is thought to alter the usual rules for mimicry complexes. In particular, a deadly model is expected to protect a wide variety of mimics. Avoidance of… Expand
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