DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF ATYPICAL HYPOADRENOCORTICISM IN A VARIABLE FLYING FOX (PTEROPUS HYPOMELANUS)

@inproceedings{Brock2013DIAGNOSISAM,
  title={DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF ATYPICAL HYPOADRENOCORTICISM IN A VARIABLE FLYING FOX (PTEROPUS HYPOMELANUS)},
  author={A Paige Brock and Natalie H. Hall and K L Cooke and David J. Reese and Jessica A. Emerson and James F. X. Wellehan},
  booktitle={Journal of zoo and wildlife medicine : official publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians},
  year={2013}
}
Abstract:  A 19-yr-old intact female variable flying fox (Pteropus hypomelanus) presented with lethargy, behavior changes, and substantial weight loss. Initial clinical pathology revealed hypoglycemia and reduced ionized serum calcium, and imaging, including computed tomography, did not lead to a diagnosis. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test revealed baseline and post-ACTH cortisol concentrations that were lower than reported normal baseline cortisol concentrations in this… Expand
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