• Corpus ID: 55636110

D-ASPARTATE IN THE MAMMALIAN BODY

@inproceedings{Homma2002DASPARTATEIT,
  title={D-ASPARTATE IN THE MAMMALIAN BODY},
  author={Hiroshi Homma},
  year={2002}
}
(Abstract) After some doubt, it has now been confirmed that D-amino acids occur naturally in mammalian tissues. In this review, I describe our work with D-aspartate. Immunohistochemical staining reveals that D-aspartate is found in specific cells at distinct periods during the development of rat brain, adrenal, pineal, and pituitary glands, and testis. D-Aspartate appears to be synthesized by the pituitary gland and testis and then secreted into the vascular system which transports it to… 

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Biochemistry of D-aspartate in mammalian cells
TLDR
D-Asp is apparently in dynamic flux at the cellular level to carry out its physiological function(s) in mammals.
HPLC determination of acidic D-amino acids and their N-methyl derivatives in biological tissues.
TLDR
This method detected D-Asp, NMDA and NMDG in several biological tissues (octopus brain, optical lobe and bucchal mass; foot and mantle of the mollusk Scapharca broughtonii), confirming the results of other researchers.
d-Aspartic acid induced oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunctions in testis of prepubertal rats
TLDR
The findings suggest the potential of d-Asp to induce oxidative perturbations in the testis of prepubertal rats and this mechanism may in part be responsible for the observed physiological effects.
Molecular cloning of a cDNA encoding mouse D-aspartate oxidase and functional characterization of its recombinant proteins by site-directed mutagenesis
TLDR
Results suggest that the Arg-216 and Arg-237 residues of the mouse DASPO are catalytically important for full enzyme activity.
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TLDR
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