Déjà vu: the evolution of feeding morphologies in the Carnivora

@article{Valkenburgh2007DjVT,
  title={D{\'e}j{\`a} vu: the evolution of feeding morphologies in the Carnivora},
  author={Blaire van Valkenburgh},
  journal={Integrative and Comparative Biology},
  year={2007},
  volume={47},
  pages={147-163}
}
  • B. Valkenburgh
  • Published 1 July 2007
  • Environmental Science, Geography, Biology
  • Integrative and Comparative Biology
The fossil record of the order Carnivora extends back at least 60 million years and documents a remarkable history of adaptive radiation characterized by the repeated, independent evolution of similar feeding morphologies in distinct clades. Within the order, convergence is apparent in the iterative appearance of a variety of ecomorphs, including cat-like, hyena-like, and wolf-like hypercarnivores, as well as a variety of less carnivorous forms, such as foxes, raccoons, and ursids. The… 

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