Cytotoxicity, Fractionation and Dereplication of Extracts of the Dinoflagellate Vulcanodinium rugosum, a Producer of Pinnatoxin G

@article{Geiger2013CytotoxicityFA,
  title={Cytotoxicity, Fractionation and Dereplication of Extracts of the Dinoflagellate Vulcanodinium rugosum, a Producer of Pinnatoxin G},
  author={Marie Geiger and Gwena{\"e}lle Desanglois and Kevin N. Hogeveen and Val{\'e}rie Fessard and Thomas Lepr{\^e}tre and Florence Mondeguer and Yann Guitton and Fabienne Herve and V{\'e}ronique S{\'e}chet and Olivier Grovel and Yves François Pouchus and Philipp Hess},
  journal={Marine Drugs},
  year={2013},
  volume={11},
  pages={3350 - 3371}
}
Pinnatoxin G (PnTX-G) is a marine toxin belonging to the class of cyclic imines and produced by the dinoflagellate Vulcanodinium rugosum. In spite of its strong toxicity to mice, leading to the classification of pinnatoxins into the class of “fast-acting toxins”, its hazard for human health has never been demonstrated. In this study, crude extracts of V. rugosum exhibited significant cytotoxicity against Neuro2A and KB cells. IC50 values of 0.38 µg mL−1 and 0.19 µg mL−1 were estimated on… Expand
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