Cytokine-release syndrome: overview and nursing implications.

@article{Breslin2007CytokinereleaseSO,
  title={Cytokine-release syndrome: overview and nursing implications.},
  author={S. Breslin},
  journal={Clinical journal of oncology nursing},
  year={2007},
  volume={11 1 Suppl},
  pages={
          37-42
        }
}
  • S. Breslin
  • Published 2007
  • Medicine
  • Clinical journal of oncology nursing
Cytokine-release syndrome is a symptom complex associated with the use of many monoclonal antibodies. Commonly referred to as an infusion reaction, it results from the release of cytokines from cells targeted by the antibody as well as immune effector cells recruited to the area. When cytokines are released into the circulation, systemic symptoms such as fever, nausea, chills, hypotension, tachycardia, asthenia, headache, rash, scratchy throat, and dyspnea can result. In most patients, the… Expand
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