Cytokine-induced sickness behaviour: mechanisms and implications

@article{Konsman2002CytokineinducedSB,
  title={Cytokine-induced sickness behaviour: mechanisms and implications},
  author={Jan Pieter Konsman and Patricia Parnet and Robert Dantzer},
  journal={Trends in Neurosciences},
  year={2002},
  volume={25},
  pages={154-159}
}
Sickness behaviour represents the expression of the adaptive reorganization of the priorities of the host during an infectious episode. This process is triggered by pro-inflammatory cytokines produced by peripheral phagocytic cells in contact with invading micro-organisms. The peripheral immune message is relayed to the brain via a fast neural pathway and a slower humoral pathway, resulting in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines in macrophage-like cells and microglia in the brain. The… Expand
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