Cytogerontology since 1881: A reappraisal of August Weismann and a review of modern progress

@article{Kirkwood2004CytogerontologyS1,
  title={Cytogerontology since 1881: A reappraisal of August Weismann and a review of modern progress},
  author={Thomas B. L. Kirkwood and Thomas Cremer},
  journal={Human Genetics},
  year={2004},
  volume={60},
  pages={101-121}
}
SummaryCytogerontology, the science of cellular ageing, originated in 1881 with the prediction by August Weismann that the somatic cells of higher animals have limited division potential. Weismann's prediction was derived by considering the role of natural selection in regulating the duration of an organism's life. For various reasons, Weismann's ideas on ageing fell into neglect following his death in 1914, and cytogerontology has only reappeared as a major research area following the… 
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