Cyst of the medullary conus: malformative persistence of terminal ventricle or compressive dilatation?

@article{Celli2001CystOT,
  title={Cyst of the medullary conus: malformative persistence of terminal ventricle or compressive dilatation?},
  author={Paolo Celli and Giancarlo D’Andrea and Giuseppe Trill{\`o} and Raffaelino Roperto and Michele Acqui and Luigi Ferrante},
  journal={Neurosurgical Review},
  year={2001},
  volume={25},
  pages={103-106}
}
Abstract. The ventriculus terminalis is a cavity situated at the level of the conus medullaris, enclosed by ependymal tissue and normally present as a virtual cavity or as a mere ependymal residue. In rare cases, and almost exclusively in pediatric age, the ventriculus terminalis may be visualized by radiological investigations, either by sonography or MRI, and represents a transient finding in children under 5 years of age. In pathological conditions, a cyst of the conus medullaris is probably… 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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The Slowly Enlarging Ventriculus Terminalis
TLDR
This, to the authors' knowledge, is the first described case of a slowly enlarging VT independent of any other imaging findings in a patient with progressing lower limb weakness without any history or imaging findings of trauma or spinal canal abnormalities.
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TLDR
The data suggest that the site, age, and histological characteristics of the lesion allow VT dilation as a nosological entity distinct from other cystic dilations of the conus medullaris to be defined.
MR imaging of ventriculus terminalis of the conus medullaris: A report of two operated patients and review of the literature
TLDR
2 patients in whom a cystic dilation of the conus medullaris was incidentally found at MR imaging carried out in the work-up for sciatica are reported on, avoiding surgery in a substantial number of cases.
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