Cycling through American Politics

@article{Resnick1990CyclingTA,
  title={Cycling through American Politics},
  author={David Resnick and Norman C. Thomas},
  journal={Polity},
  year={1990},
  volume={23},
  pages={1 - 21}
}
"The great problem in American politics," E. E. Schattschneider writes, "is: What makes things happen? ... What is the process of change? What does change look like?" Schattschneider offered a theory of political conflict in answer to his question, but the more common response is some variant on the idea of cycles-of regular rhythms or recurring patterns-whose dynamic is the key to unlocking the mysteries of change in American politics. This article analyzes cyclical theories of politics… 
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