Cyber-Bullying and Incivility in an Online Learning Environment, Part 2: Promoting Student Success in the Virtual Classroom

@article{Clark2012CyberBullyingAI,
  title={Cyber-Bullying and Incivility in an Online Learning Environment, Part 2: Promoting Student Success in the Virtual Classroom},
  author={Cynthia M. Clark and Sara M. Ahten and Loredana Werth},
  journal={Nurse Educator},
  year={2012},
  volume={37},
  pages={192–197}
}
The appeal of online learning has increased dramatically among nurses who are pursuing higher-education opportunities. However, online learning has created potential avenues for uncivil behaviors that can affect student satisfaction, performance, and retention. This is the second of 2 articles detailing a study to empirically measure nursing faculty and student perceptions of an online learning environment (OLE). Part 1, in the July/August 2012 issue, described the quantitative results… 
Cyber-bullying and Incivility in the Online Learning Environment, Part 1: Addressing Faculty and Student Perceptions
TLDR
The authors discuss the quantitative results including the types and frequency of uncivil behaviors and the extent to which they are perceived to be a problem in online courses.
Incivility in the Online Classroom: A Guide for Policy Development
TLDR
The purpose of this article is to review problems associated with student incivility and share the experience in creating as well as implementing a professionalism policy that addresses student incvility.
Exploring nursing student and faculty perceptions of incivility in the online learning environment
Objective : The purpose of the study was to explore student and faculty perspectives regarding what constitutes incivility in the online learning environment (OLE). Online learning is increasingly
Faculty and Student Incivility in Undergraduate Nursing Education: An Integrative Review.
TLDR
The results support data that incivility has harmful physical and psychological effects on both faculty and students, and also disturbs the teaching-learning environment.
The Relationship between Online Classroom Incivility and Sense of Community of Online Undergraduate Students
Incivility is not just bullying and physically threatening students. Uncivil behaviors include more mild forms of classroom disruption, including plagiarizing, posting terse responses, and
Confronting Incivility in the Online Classroom
ABSTRACT: Confronting incivility in the online classroom can significantly benefit from spiritual approaches that address behaviors on a continuum of mild to aggressive. This may include the need to
Exploration of Cybercivility in Nursing Education Using Cross-Country Comparisons
TLDR
Frequency of cyberincivility experience and perceived learning benefit were lower for students in the USA than in HK and K, and Acceptability of cybercivility was significantly lower in respondents from K.
An Integrative Review of Cybercivility in Health Professions Education
TLDR
Efforts to prevent cyberincivility can be achieved through focused education on cybercivility, development of clear policies related to its consequences, and formulation of guidelines for both student and faculty behavior online.
“Mutual Respect Would be a Good Starting Point:” Students’ Perspectives on Incivility in Nursing Education
TLDR
Until evidence is available for effective measures to address incivility, nursing schools should consider adopting strategies for solutions as suggested by the students in this study.
Experiences of incivility amon g faculty and students in online nursing education: a qualitative systematic review protocol
TLDR
The objective of this review is to synthesize available evidence of nursing faculty’s and nursing students’ experiences and perceptions of incivility in online education with the objective of identifying the meaning of incivism in online nursing education.
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